Category Archives: Blog

Difference Between STNA and CNA

Sometimes getting the acronyms of this industry seem like alphabet soup – but let us help you straighten it all out! Today, let’s check out the difference between a CNA and an STNA. And don’t worry – it’s actually super easy.

Let’s start with CNA. CNA stands for Certified Nursing Assistant, and their role is typically providing non-medical, direct patient care. They work under supervising RNs, LPNs, and doctors by taking and recording vital signs, monitoring general health and reporting changes, and assisting the patient with daily living activities (bathing, dressing, eating, etc.). CNAs work in home care, assisted living facilities, nursing homes, hospitals, etc.

Moving on to the STNA, which stands for State Tested Nursing Assistant. Those with an STNA job have almost identical duties as a CNA job – they work under RNs, they take vitals, they assist with daily living activities, etc. And typically, STNAs also work in home care, assisted living, nursing homes, and hospitals.

So, HERE’S THE DIFFERENCE. STNAs exist in Ohio! They’ve just decided to use a different name for the role of a nurse aide. However, they have the same kind of training and job duties as CNAs.

Why You Should Become a CNA Before Applying to Nursing School

You might want to consider taking the time to receive your training to work as a certified nursing assistant (CNA) before applying for nursing school. It might surprise you to know that many nursing schools now want, or even require you to be a CNA to apply for the nursing program.
If you want to become a CNA, you will need to locate an accredited CNA training program in your local area. These programs are often offered through community colleges, healthcare facilities and even some branches of the Red Cross. Training programs will usually last from 3 to 6 weeks, although some programs can last longer.
After completion of a CNA training program, you will be required to take the certification exam. This test will include two sections: written and practical. The written exam will ask you to answer multiple choice questions about the information you learned during your training course. The practical section of your test will be your opportunity to demonstrate some of the CNA procedures you learned during the course.
As a CNA, you will learn many skills that will make you a valuable part of the nursing team. You will check and record vital signs for patients. In most settings, you will help to groom and bathe patients. It will often be your job to show patients ranges of motion exercises. You will also help patients with their activities of daily living. These are just a few of the tasks that you will complete as a nursing assistant.
Nursing assistants can find work at hospitals, continuing care communities, rehabilitation centers and home health agencies. Your exact duties will vary depending on the setting in which you work. When you work as a home health aide, you will often also do some light housekeeping for your clients as well as providing some companionship.
Working as a CNA, before applying to nursing school is a good idea. The CNA salary and pay scale isn’t too bad as well. You will have the opportunity to work in the healthcare setting. It will give you the opportunity to develop a good beside manner. When you are working as a certified nursing assistant, you will learn how to work with other members of the healthcare team. You will be able to observe some of the duties and tasks that are completed by nurses.
If you work as a certified nursing assistant, you will have the opportunity to determine if working in the healthcare field is right for you. After working as a nursing assistant for awhile, you might realize that you want to further your career as a healthcare provider. This is when you should start to consider furthering your education to become an LPN or RN.
Nursing schools can be quite competitive and some are even difficult to receive admissions. You will have an edge over other students who do not have their CNA training. If you have worked for awhile as a CNA, this will provide you with valuable experience that can not only help you to be admitted to nursing school, but can also leave you better prepared for your training.
This article is a guest post written by Sandra Stevens. If you‘re interested in getting more information about Certified Nursing assistant training you might want to visit her blog over at http://cnatraininghelp.com/. Additionally this report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics may also be useful: http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos327.htm

STNA Daily Tasks

A state tested nursing assistant is considered as a team player, when it comes to tasks and responsibilities. While, working under the direction of the nurses, a STNA delivers a high quality of care to patients. A STNA has to work for long hours, and that’s when, he/she has to take charge of many crucial responsibilities on a daily basis. However, all the efforts worth your toil as the skills and experiences, you gain as a State Tested nursing assistant, open multiple opportunities for long-term career in this field.

In order to provide you an in-depth knowledge of the daily tasks and many other responsibilities of a STNA; we are giving you the details of some of the essential objectives:

STNA Job Description and Responsibilities:

Providing Personal Hygiene to the patient:

A STNA has to take charge of every personal hygiene related activities for a patient. This might include providing bedpans, baths, urinals, back rubs, shaves, shampoos and etc. You might also have to support the patient by assisting him/her to the bathroom and helping in taking showers or baths.

Taking care of meals and feeding: After being a STNA, you also have to assist patients in their routine activities, like serving meals, feeding the patients, ambulating and positioning the patients, supplying fresh water, nourishment and meals to the patients.

Giving Adjunct Care: A STNA has also to be prepared for providing adjunct care activities to the patient by administering douches, enemas, ice packs, surgical preps, heat treatments, sits and therapeutic baths, applying restraints, no sterile dressings, etc.

Checking Vital Signs: You also have to uphold a patient’s stability by noticing and reading their vital signs. These include measuring weight, quantifying the urine, recording the intake and output of food, etc.

Providing the comfort: To provide the patients comfort, by making use of resources and materials; also comes under a STNA’s responsibility. This includes transporting patients, responding to patients call lights, reporting the observations to the supervisor, etc.

Documents actions: You might have to complete the forms and maintain the logs, reports and records of a patient.

Maintaining work operations: You also have to maintain your job duties, while following policies and procedures of the facility you work.

Upholding the organization’s esteem: You do not only have to work hard for the organization, but also need to preserve the patient’s information undisclosed. This will keep the facility’s reputation encouraged.

Adhering to the occupational standards: You have to be obliged and serve the hospital community by adhering to their professional standards. You do not only have to follow the hospital guidelines and procedures, but stick to the federal, state and local requirements, as well.

Keeping the job knowledge updated: You must participate in educational opportunities, read professional publications, participate in professional organizations and maintain licensure, to keep the job relevant knowledge updated.

Managing medications and treatments: A STNA must have practiced well for doing some crucial processes of a patient, like catheterizations, irrigations, suppositories, enemas, douches, massages, etc directed by a physician or a nurse.

Cleaning the patient’s rooms and changing the bed linens: As patients usually are not in a condition to take turn frequently on their beds, or do other necessary work themselves. Hence, this also becomes a STNA’s duty to conduct all these for such patients.

Preparing food, serving and collecting the food trays: In order to treat a specific patient, who requires special treatment or food; you might have to serve food to them. Once they have finished their meals, it might be essential for you to collect the food trays to calculate their daily intakes.

Providing patient care: This may include supplying and draining the bed pans, directing exercise routines and applying dressings. Moreover, you may also have to help the patients, while walking, exercising and coming in and out of bed. Shifting a patient to the treatment units with the help of a wheelchair or a stretcher also comes under patient care. Turning and re-positioning of a bedridden patient, doing it alone or taking anyone’s assistance, also a necessary patient care treatment to prevent bedsores.

Answering phones and directing the visitors: In some instances, you might also have to handle these.

Collect specimens: Taking urine samples and feces or sputum specimens for lab testing is also one of the major tasks of a STNA.

Explaining medical instructions and policies: There may be times, when you need to explain all the facility policies to the patient’s family members. Before, conducting any medical activity for any patient, it is imperative that you make them understand about the entire procedure.

Maintaining the inventory: You may also have to store, prepare, sterilize and issue supplies; like dressing packs, treatment trays, etc.

Performing clerical duties: Processing documents or scheduling appointments; these may also come under your job duty.

Setting up equipments: Organizing equipments, like oxygen tents, manageable x-ray machines, overhead irrigation bottles, etc.

Besides, these main duties and responsibilities; a STNA also needs to provide emotional support to the patient. All these, together bring a positive change in any patient’s ailing conditions. However, being a state tested nursing assistant; you must always be prepared with a positive approach, to take the upcoming challenges of the nursing profession.

 

A successful STNA Career

There are endless possibilities and paths to build your STNA career. Even after you earn a STNA certificate, the opportunities don’t end there. STNAs can use their experience and education to pursue other medical careers like LPN, and RN. And with new, credible programs available like Columbus STNA School, STNAs are given access to all the tools they need to succeed. But what else does it take to be the best in your STNA career?

The real question you should be asking is, “Who is successful, and why?”

Great news. Success is not determined by your ability to know the name of Kim Kardashian’s baby, your knowledge of Taylor Swift’s boyfriends, or even your IQ. The key to success is grit. Grit is having the passion and drive to finish long term goals and working hard to see that dream a reality. You may not have mastered a technique yet or maybe you’ve had a bad day at work, but becoming a STNA means having the grit to see each day through and try your best to only get better. Check out these few tricks to build your grit!

Grit: Having a Knack for the STNA Job

  • Don’t give up: It’s important to just. keep. trying. Have you ever heard of the story about a successful caregiver who quit his caregiver career? No? Neither have I. The point is, you can’t be successful in your STNA job if you give up half way or quit.
  • Think Positive: Or think about ice cream and rainbows. Whatever works for you. Studies show that thinking positively reduces stress, builds better coping skills during hard times, and is better for your overall psychological health. Building your tolerance for tough times will help you achieve your goals and be successful in your career.
  • Focus on the Long Term Goals: If you want to build a healthy, successful career as a caregiver, then you have to realize that self-improvement is a long term goal. This means some personal sacrifices have to be made. It means skipping the late night rerun of Honey Boo Boo to get up early for the morning shift. It means spending an extra 30 minutes helping out a coworker when they need help.
  • Enjoy: Business and professional life aside, find a hobby or time to relax to keep yourself from getting STNA burnout. Every job is a marathon, not a sprint. So pace yourself, and learn to love the job for what it is, a journey.

Why You Should Become a CNA Before Applying to Nursing School

You might want to consider taking the time to receive your training to work as a state tested nursing assistant (STNA) before applying for nursing school. It might surprise you to know that many nursing schools now want, or even require you to be a CNA to apply for the nursing program.

If you want to become a CNA, you will need to locate an accredited STNA training program in your local area. These programs are often offered through community colleges, healthcare facilities and even some branches of the Red Cross. Training programs will usually last from 2 to 6 weeks, although some programs can last longer.

After completion of a STNA training program, you will be required to take the certification exam. This test will include two sections: written and practical. The written exam will ask you to answer multiple choice questions about the information you learned during your training course. The practical section of your test will be your opportunity to demonstrate some of the CNA procedures you learned during the course.

As a STNA, you will learn many skills that will make you a valuable part of the nursing team. You will check and record vital signs for patients. In most settings, you will help to groom and bathe patients. It will often be your job to show patients ranges of motion exercises. You will also help patients with their activities of daily living. These are just a few of the tasks that you will complete as a nursing assistant.

Nursing assistants can find work at hospitals, continuing care communities, rehabilitation centers and home health agencies. Your exact duties will vary depending on the setting in which you work. When you work as a home health aide, you will often also do some light housekeeping for your clients as well as providing some companionship.

Working as a CNA, before applying to nursing school is a good idea. The STNA salary and pay scale isn’t too bad as well. You will have the opportunity to work in the healthcare setting. It will give you the opportunity to develop a good beside manner. When you are working as a certified nursing assistant, you will learn how to work with other members of the healthcare team. You will be able to observe some of the duties and tasks that are completed by nurses.

If you work as a certified nursing assistant, you will have the opportunity to determine if working in the healthcare field is right for you. After working as a nursing assistant for awhile, you might realize that you want to further your career as a healthcare provider. This is when you should start to consider furthering your education to become an LPN or RN.

Nursing schools can be quite competitive and some are even difficult to receive admissions. You will have an edge over other students who do not have their STNA training. If you have worked for awhile as a STNA, this will provide you with valuable experience that can not only help you to be admitted to nursing school, but can also leave you better prepared for your training.

This article is a guest post written by Sandra Stevens. If you‘re interested in getting more information about Certified Nursing assistant training you might want to visit her blog over at http://cnatraininghelp.com/. Additionally this report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics may also be useful: http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos327.htm